Category Archives: Digital Agenda

Digital Agenda – Reflections and further resources

Reflection

It’s now time to try to make sense of all the learning you have embarked upon during this module.

You could use a personal blog or just grab some paper, it may be helpful to begin by writing down:

3 things you learned or thought about as part of your studies in this module.

  • What worked best for you and why?

Now think about and write down answers to some or all of the following:

  • How might the new digital era affect you now and in the future?
  • What steps do you need to take to improve your digital literacy?
  • How might digitalisation affect your job or personal circumstances?
  • What issues have arisen that you feel you want to consider in more detail?

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Here is a collection of all of the references we have used in this module

Bimrose, J., Brown, A., Barnes, S-A., & Hughes, D. (2011) The role of career adaptability in skills supply. Wath-upon-Dearne:

BIS & DCMS (2016) Digital Skills for the UK Economy: A report by ECORYS UK, London: Department for Innovation and Department for Culture, Media and Sports, January 2016

COM (2010) 2020 final, Retrieved from: http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?:2010:2020:FIN:EN:PDF

Done, J. & Mulvey, R. (2016) Brilliant Graduate Career Handbook. 3rd edition. Harlow: Pearson available from Amazon

European Commission (2014). Digital Agenda for Europe: Rebooting Europe’s Economy. Brussels. Retrieved from: https://europa.eu/european-union/topics/digital-economy-society_en

Europe 2020 (2010). Communication from the Commission – EUROPE 2020: A strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, Brussels, 3.3.2010

Hunter, A. J. (2001). A cross-cultural comparison of resilience in adolescents. Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 16, 172-179

Lengelle, R., Van der Heijden, B and Meijers, F. (In Press) The Foundations of Career Resilience,

Kettunen, J., Sampson, J. P., & Vuorinen, R. (2015). Career practitioners’ conceptions of competency for social media in career services. British Journal of Guidance & Counseling, 43, 43-56.

Lengelle, R., Van der Heijden, B and Meijers, F. (In Press) The Foundations of Career Resilience, Springer Books.

Lyons, S. T., Schweitzer, L. and Ng, E. S. W. (2015) ‘Resilience in the modern career’, Career Development International, 20(4), 363–383.

Metzl, E. S. and Morrell, M. A. (2008). ‘The role of creativity in models of resilience: Theoretical exploration and practical applications’, Journal of Creativity in Mental Health, 3(3), 303–318.

OCED (2015). Data-Driven Innovation: Big data for Growth and Well Being, Paris: OECD Publishing. Retrieved from: http://www.oecd.org/sti/ieconomy/data-driven-innovation.htm

OECD (2016) Skills for a Digital World: 2016 Ministerial Meeting On The Digital Economy – Background Report, Mexico: Organisation of Cooperation and Economic Development, 21 -23rd June 2016. Retrieved from: http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/science-and-technology/skills-for-a-digital-world_5jlwz83z3wnw-en#.WKonnGSLQ_U#page1

Savickas, M. L., Nota, L., Rossier, J., Dauwalder, J. P., Duarte, M. E., Guichard, J. and Van Vianen, A. E. (2009) ‘Life designing: A paradigm for career construction in the 21st century’, Journal of Vocational Behavior, 75(3), 239–250; and Savickas, M. L. (2011) ‘Career Counseling’, Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Springer Books. 41 Metzl, E. S. and Morrell, M. A. (2008). ‘The role of creativity in models of resilience: Theoretical exploration and practical applications’, Journal of Creativity in Mental Health, 3(3), 303–318.

The Guardian (2014) The truth about smart cities: ‘in the end, they will destroy democracy’ – 17th December 2014. Retrieved from: https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2014/dec/17/truth-smart-city-destroy-democracy-urban-thinkers-buzzphrase

UKCES (2014) The Future of Work: Jobs and Skills in 2030:  Evidence Report 84, Sheffield: Wath-upon-Dearne, February 2014

The Guardian (2014) The truth about smart cities: ‘in the end, they will destroy democracy’ – 17th December 2014. Retrieved from: https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2014/dec/17/truth-smart-city-destroy-democracy-urban-thinkers-buzzphrase

Other resources you may find useful

http://www.learnmyway.com/

Eurofound report on the future of work – http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/sites/default/files/ef_publication/field_ef_document/ef1634en.pdf

Hughes, D., Bimrose, J., Brown, C., Goddard, T., and Kettunen, J. (2013). E-Careers Services Symposium: expanding the limits of design, technology, and practice. CDDA Communiqué, Sydney: Career Development Association of Australia.

International Symposium for Career development and Public Policy – Country Reports 2017. Visit: http://iccdpp2017.org/key-outcomes/country-paper/  and http://www.is2015.org/country-papers/ – See: The role of emerging technologies (2015)

Hughes, D. (2015) London Ambitions: Shaping a careers offer for all young Londoners, London Enterprise Panel & London Councils. This includes a recommendation for all young Londoners to have a digital portfolio. Available online: https://lep.london/publication/london-ambitions-careers-offer


International Perspectives

The Future of Work and Skills

Digital Jobs, Digital Workforce

Digital Jobseekers, Digital Employers

Reflection and Further Resources

Digital jobseekers, digital employers

Modern day jobseekers will find it increasingly difficult to find employment without having a digital presence and using digital skills to search for and apply for jobs online. Similarly, employers need the digital skills for succesful online recruitment. The ability to interact in these online environments is often referred to as digital literacy. Having a presence in an online environment gives you a digital identity. This unit looks at digital literacy, skills, identity and jobsearches.

Digital Literacy

Digital Literacy is a popular topic for educators with many national curricula around Europe being re-written to encompass digital skills but what does it mean for you and for clients searching for jobs?

Jisc defines it as the capabilities which fit someone for living, learning and working in a digital society. (Follow the link and select ‘guide to developing digital literacies’ for further reading)

The report by ECORYS (2016) encompases digital literacy as a digital skill (you have already seen this document in a previous unit);

Over recent years, the definition of digital skills has broadened out to the concept of digital literacy encompassing multiple types of skill-sets such as basic, operational, cognitive, social and attitudinal. 

The policy paper shows a useful map of digital skills shown below but you can find a bigger version on page 49 of the document. (Click on the image to be redirected to the document then scroll to page 49)

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Activity

Thinking back to the last 2 units and the diagram above (also on page 49 of Digital Skills for the UK Economy ) answer the following;

  • What digital skills do you need to be able to do your job effectively? 
  • What skills might others need?
  • How do you learn these skills?
  • How will others learn them?

Activity – You might like to try this digital literacy skills test with a certificate of achievement at the end.

Digital Identity

Everyone who uses the internet leaves a trail of information about themselves, even if you do not create or share content you are still leaving footprints in the form of search history and cookies. Digital marketers use this information to target you with tailored adverts and even tailored search results.

Search for yourself on-line, what do you find? What do you want people to find when they search for you? You might want the answer to be nothing, but equally you might want to present your professional skills, qualifications and achievements.

In some occupational areas having a multi-platform, online presence can be very important. For example, if you were an employer looking for a computer games developer or a marketing professional or a researcher you would expect the successful candidate to show up on a variety of social media. If they didn’t, then you might question their enthusiasm or abilities. In other jobs it is far less important. A jobseeker would need to consider carefully whether a future employer would expect them to be an active social media user, and if so, how to construct an on-line presence that demonstrates they have the skills an employer is looking for before they ever get to the interview stage.

Activity

Consider the following digital items you may have.  Arrange them on a continuum from ‘very private’ to ‘very public’.

Activity

Complete some of these Digital Identity activities from EmployID.

Digital Jobsearch

Jobseekers increasingly need to be tech savvy not just in searching for but also in applying for jobs.  A recent advert for a bar-tender vacancy called for applicants to upload a short introductory video about themselves. It is clear that digital literacy is fast becoming an essential skill in a competitive market.

Activity

Read this handy guide from Dr Judith Done and Professor Rachel Mulvey.

Let’s try to bring together your thoughts and ideas

  • What digital skills do you and others need to be able to do your job effectively?
  • How do you learn these skills?
  • How do you present yourself online?
  • How does online presence impact on a person’s ability to find a job?
  • How does job search and recruitment differ around the world?

 

You can find more in the book;

Done, J. & Mulvey, R. (2016) Brilliant Graduate Career Handbook. 3rd edition. Harlow: Pearson available from Amazon


International Perspectives

The Future of Work and Skills

Digital Jobs, Digital Workforce

Digital Jobseekers, Digital Employers

Reflection and Further Resources

Digital jobs, digital workforce.

In this unit we look at how the new digital era might affect the types of job available and how new technologies might mean some jobs become automated. Will the rise of the machines affect you and how can you future-proof yourself?

 

Jobs of the Future

Listen to ‘Futurist’ Mark Pesce talk about how work will be different in future (55 seconds in) and the suggestions of possible future jobs.

Activity

Think of some possible job titles for the future, here are some ideas to get you started.

      • Digital architect – Designs a selection of virtual buildings for advertisers and retailers to market their products;
      • Body part maker – Creates living body parts for athletes and soldiers;
      • Nano-medic – Creates very small implants for health monitoring and self-medication;
      • Vertical farmer – Farms crops upwards rather than across flat fields to save space;
      • Climate controller – Manages and modifies weather patterns;
      • Avatar manager – Designs and manages holograms of virtual people;
      • Memory augmentation surgeon – Helps preserve and improve memory in an ageing population;
      • Child designer – Designs offspring that fit parental requirements;
      • Omnipotence delimiter – Reins in our belief that anything is possible and we are all-powerful;
      • Personal medical apothecary – Provides a bespoke range alternative therapies;
      • Haptic programmer – Develops technology around the science of touch, such as gloves that make your hand feel warm, or wrapped in velvet.

In the video above, Mark Peske says that if a job can be automated it will be. Do you agree?

Have a look at these fun quizzes designed to help you think about yourself and digital transformation.

Thinking about future technologies – Will a robot take your job? Follow the link then type a job into the search bar, will the job become automated in the future?

There’s another similar quiz here if you’d like to double check!

Now we will look at ways to future-proof yourself. If your job is at risk of becoming automated you will need to think about career adaptability and resilience in the face of change.

Try this reflective quiz

Thinking about yourself – What animal are you?

Resilience

Take a few minutes to reflect on what steps you can take to future-proof yourself, then watch the video about resilience.

If you’d like to find out more, there is a substantial body of literature on ‘career adaptability’ (Savickas et al., 2009; Savickas, 2011) as discussed in Week 1.

Building on this and reflecting on career resilience (Lyons, Schweitzer, and Ng,2015). we can think of resilience as ‘the process of bending and rebounding to overcome adversity’ (Hunter, 2001, p. 172) as noted by Lengelle et al. (2016).

This is a multi-dimensional phenomenon that varies according to contexts, internal variables, and external changes. Resilience is often viewed as a positive outcome ‘which is defined by the presence of positive mental health (such as positive self-concept and self-esteem, academic achievement, success at age-appropriate developmental tasks, etc.) and the absence of psychopathology, despite exposure to risk’ (Metzl and Morrell, 2008). This concept is also interpreted as a dynamic learning process dependent upon interactions between individual and contextual variables that evolve over time. In this sense, resilience refers to the capability to ‘bounce back’ from negative emotional experiences associated with adversity.

So what steps can you take?

You could employ some of the techniques discussed in last week’s lesson on Coaching and Peer coaching to help with problem solving and finding creative solutions.

You can look at your digital skills – see the next unit for ideas.

 

 

References

Bimrose, J., Brown, A., Barnes, S-A., & Hughes, D. (2011) The role of career adaptability in skills supply. Wath-upon-Dearne: UKCES (UK Commission for Employment and Skills). (UKCES Evidence Report).

Hunter, A. J. (2001). A cross-cultural comparison of resilience in adolescents. Journal of Pediatric
Nursing
, 16, 172-179  Lengelle, R., Van der Heijden, B and Meijers, F. (In Press) The Foundations of Career Resilience,

Kettunen, J., Sampson, J. P., & Vuorinen, R. (2015). Career practitioners’ conceptions of competency for social media in career services. British Journal of Guidance & Counseling, 43, 43-56. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03069885.2014.939945 doi:10.1080/03069885.2014.939945

Lengelle, R., Van der Heijden, B and Meijers, F. (In Press) The Foundations of Career Resilience, Springer Books.

Lyons, S. T., Schweitzer, L. and Ng, E. S. W. (2015) ‘Resilience in the modern career’, Career Development International, 20(4), 363–383.

Metzl, E. S. and Morrell, M. A. (2008). ‘The role of creativity in models of resilience: Theoretical exploration and practical applications’, Journal of Creativity in Mental Health, 3(3), 303–318.

Savickas, M. L., Nota, L., Rossier, J., Dauwalder, J. P., Duarte, M. E., Guichard, J. and Van Vianen, A. E. (2009) ‘Life designing: A paradigm for career construction in the 21st century’, Journal of Vocational Behavior, 75(3), 239–250; and Savickas, M. L. (2011) ‘Career Counseling’, Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Springer Books. 41 Metzl, E. S. and Morrell, M. A. (2008). ‘The role of creativity in models of resilience: Theoretical exploration and practical applications’, Journal of Creativity in Mental Health, 3(3), 303–318.


International Perspectives

The Future of Work and Skills

Digital Jobs, Digital Workforce

Digital Jobseekers, Digital Employers

Reflection and Further Resources

The Future of Work and Skills

Skills for a Digital World

A report published by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (OECD, 2016) provides some evidence on the effects of digital technologies on the demand for skills in differing economies. It discusses key policies for skills development adapted to a 21st century digital economy. The authors argue workers across an increasing range of occupations need higher level ICT skills to use new technologies effectively. More fundamentally, the diffusion of digital technologies is changing how work is done, raising demand for complementary skills such as information processing, self-direction, problem solving and communication. You can read the full report here.

Want to delve into some country specific examples? See: Norway (p.18); Spain (p.21); Ireland (p.22); The Netherlands (p.25); Korea and Ireland – insights to SMEs and digital innovations (p.26); Canada (p.29); Italy (p.37); and the UK Open Source Data (p.44)

This poses both challenges and opportunities for greater responsiveness of governments to national skills shortages and skills gaps. For example, here is a UK government policy paper ‘Industrial Strategy’ (January, 2017) that highlights:

  “Within the next two decades, 90 per cent of jobs will require some digital proficiency, yet 23 per cent of adults lack basic     digital skills. This is a barrier topeople fulfilling their potential and to a more productive workforce.” (House of Commons,     London: Science and Technology Committee (2016) ‘Digital Skills Crisis’)

In response, Tinder Foundation CEO Helen Milner indicates that a wider proliferation of digital skills would release a surprising amount of value into the economy. “Some of our research showed that every £1 invested in growing people’s basic digital skills put £10 back into the economy. But it’s not enough to save money – you’ve got to show how you can make money out of it as well.” (NewStatesman, October 2016) – http://www.newstatesman.com/politics/media/2016/10/industrial-strategy-ensuring-digital-skills-are-included

Another report, the DCMS Digital Skills Report has the following to say about digital skills;

“The rapid rate of technological innovations requires the current workforce to continually update their skills to equip them for emerging roles in the sectors in which they work,which have been influenced by new technologies. In the context of social inclusion, the application of digital skills offers wider opportunities for society and democracy.”

“Digital skills range from those that enable basic social interaction (communication skills, literacy,smartphone usage etc) through to skills that enable interaction with systems and services (for example, e-commerce and e-government services) through to skills that match the needs of employers and which maximise employability.

We will look at the DCMS Digital Skills Report again in the next unit.

Activity

Reflect – What digital skills do you use every day? Are there any you would like to improve?

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Image Pixabay cc0

Data Driven Innovation

Today, the generation and use of huge volumes of data are redefining our “intelligence” capacity and our social and economic landscapes. This is spurring new industries, processes and products and creating significant competitive advantages. In this sense, according to the Organisation for Cooperation and Economic Development (OECD, 2015),  data-driven innovation (DDI) has become a key pillar of 21st-century growth, with the potential to significantly enhance productivity, resource efficiency, economic competitiveness, and social well-being.

Greater access to, and use of, data create a wide array of personal impacts and policy challenges, ranging from privacy and consumer protection to open access issues and measurement concerns, across public and private health, legal and science domains.

 

The UK Commission for Employment & Skills (2014) identified 10 key disruptions:

1. Reverse migration

2. Changing values of employees’, where workers select employers on the basis of alignment with their own values

3. Zero-hour contracts, and similar flexible arrangements, become the norm

4. Anytime, anywhere skills delivery, enabled by virtual and peer-to-peer learning

5. Artificial intelligence (AI) and robots, penetration of AI and automation into highly skilled occupations

6. De-globalisation

7. Geographically alternative centres of excellence, a nations leading position in key economic sectors is lost to high growth economies

8. Disrupted Internet developments due to cyber crime

9. Resource conflicts or climate disasters threaten supply

10. Partial fragmentation of the EU.

Think about differing scenarios now and in the future, have a look at these four possibilities fromThe Future of Work: Jobs and Skills in 2030 (page xiv):

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Let’s try to bring together your thoughts and ideas

  • Reflect – What digital skills do you use every day? Are there any you would like to improve?
  • How do you think access to increasing amounts of data will impact the future of work and skills?
  • Consider the key disruptive factors likely to impact on economic, educational and/or social outcomes in your town, region or country.
  • Think about differing scenarios now and in the future: What are your thoughts and experiences of going digital?
  • Are there other likely scenarios? If yes, what might these include?

 

Remember you can interact with us via Twitter using #EmployIDMOOC


International Perspectives

The Future of Work and Skills

Digital Jobs, Digital Workforce

Digital Jobseekers, Digital Employers

Reflection and Further Resources

International Perspectives: A New Digital Era

The Next Industrial Revolution

Billions of people are connected by mobile devices, with unprecedented processing power, storage capacity, and access to knowledge, the possibilities are huge. These possibilities will be multiplied by emerging technology breakthroughs in fields such as artificial intelligence (AI), robotics, the Internet of Things, autonomous vehicles, 3-D printing, nanotechnology, biotechnology, materials science, energy storage, and quantum computing. The digital age has been referred to as the fourth industrial revolution.

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Infographics by Angela Rees cc4.0 

 

This video originally shared by World Economic Forum

Digital Economy

Digital technologies are central to international and European economic growth. For example, while 250 million Europeans use the internet daily, 18% have never used it at all. The digital economy is growing 7 times as fast as the rest of the economy. Much of this growth has been fuelled by broadband internet.

Recent European Union trends (DESI, 2016) show country variations when it come to  (i) connectivity; (ii) human capital; (iii) use of internet; (iv) integration of digital technologies; and (v) digital public services.

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For example, Denmark, Finland, Sweden and the Netherlands have the most advanced digital economies in the EU followed by Luxembourg, Belgium, the UK and Ireland, Romania, Bulgaria, Greece and Italy have the lowest scores in the DESI. In 2016, all Member States improved on the DESI. Slovakia and Slovenia progressed the most (more than 0.04 as opposed to an EU average of 0.028). On the other hand, there was low increase in Portugal, Latvia and Germany (below 0.02). See here to download country reports, studies and open datasets:  https://ec.europa.eu/digital-single-market/en/desi#the-digital-economy-and-society-index-desi

“Digital technologies are going into every aspect of life. All they require is access to high-speed internet. We need to be connected, our economy needs it, people need it.” Jean-Claude Juncker, State of the Union Address European Parliament, 14 September 2016.

You may also find this presentation on the possibility of a digital single market for Europe puts forward some interesting ideas.

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Today’s high-speed broadband networks are having just as great an impact as electricity and transport networks a century ago. They are also paving the way for innovative services such as eHealth and Social Care Strategies, for example in Scotland: A draft vision for the new Strategy 2017-2022.

Click on the link in each part below to view case study examples that show how the eHealth and Socal Care Strategies’ digital vision will be realised.

As a citizen of Scotland:

I have access to the digital information, tools and services I need to help maintain and improve my health and wellbeing.

I expect my health and social care information to be captured electronically, integrated and shared securely

to assist service staff and carers that need to see it, and

digital technology and data will be used appropriately and innovatively to help plan and improve services,

enable research and economic development

and ultimately improve outcomes for everyone.

Jobs and Growth in Europe

Europe 2020 is the European Union’s ten-year jobs and growth strategy. It was launched seven years ago (2010) to create the conditions for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth. Five headline targets were agreed by the European Commission for the EU to achieve by the end of 2020. These cover employment; research and development; climate/energy; education; social inclusion and poverty reduction. You can find out more about the strategy here and watch this short intro video 


International Perspectives

The Future of Work and Skills

Digital Jobs, Digital Workforce

Digital Jobseekers, Digital Employers

Reflection and Further Resources